Scientific Committee

Yukitoshi Aoyagi

Yukitoshi Aoyagi

University of Toronto

Yukitoshi Aoyagi received his Ph.D. from the Graduate Department of Community Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1996. The award of a post-doctoral scholarship followed in thermal physiology at the Defense and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine in Toronto.

From 1997-1999, he took the position of Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Human Life and Environment, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Japan. From 1999, he has have directed the Exercise Sciences Research Group at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan.

Since 2000, he has been conducting the Nakanojo Study, an interdisciplinary investigation that examines associations between yearlong continuous pedometer/accelerometer measurements of habitual physical activity and various aspects of health in an entire community of older people.

Søren Brage

Søren Brage

University of Cambridge

Søren Brage leads the Physical Activity Epidemiology Programme at the MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge. Research interests include developing and evaluating assessment methods for physical activity and fitness at population level, the descriptive epidemiology of physical activity, characterisation of the relationship between physical activity and metabolic disease, and how this relationship may be modified by genetic factors.

Bronwyn Clark

Bronwyn Clark

University of Queensland

Dr Bronwyn Clark is a NHMRC Early Career Fellow at the Cancer Prevention Research Centre in the School of Public Health at the University of Queensland, Australia. Her PhD research concentrated on assessing the quality of self-report measures of sitting time and developing new measures. Her current research builds on this work to examine both self-reported and device based measures of sitting time and activity including the ability to determine how and where time spent sedentary and active changes when intervened upon. She has a particular interest in measuring these behaviours in the workplace setting.
Alison Cernich

Alison Cernich

National Institutes of Health

Alison Cernich, Ph.D., is the Director of the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health.  She provides oversight for the portfolio of NCMRR which aims to foster development of the scientific knowledge needed to enhance the health, productivity, independence, and quality-of-life of people with physical disabilities.  She works across the NIH and with other federal agencies to coordinate research initiatives relevant to disability and rehabilitation research. She is a board certified neuropsychologist by training and is the lead or contributing author on multiple peer-reviewed articles and conference presentations.
Alan Donnelly

Alan Donnelly

University of Limerick

Alan Donnelly is currently treasurer for the ISMPB society, and was chair of the local organising committee for the 2015 ICAMPAM held in Limerick, Ireland.  He is an associate Professor at the University of Limerick, where his research team’s work focuses on the accurate measurement of sedentary behaviour, and the impact of this behaviour on health indices in cross sectional samples and cohorts of adolescent and older adults.
Ulrich Ebner-Priemer

Ulrich Ebner-Priemer

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Ulrich Ebner-Priemer is Professor at the Institute for Sport and Sport Science, at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany. The focus of his research is characterized by its methodological focus on Ambulatory Assessment. Phenomena of interest are studied in everyday life (real-life) in real-time using psychophysiological methods (objective) and time-sensitive analysis (dynamics). Real-time analysis of psychophysiological parameters are used to trigger e-diary assessments (GPS-triggered e-diaries, phyical activity triggered e-diaries). He is currently President of the Society of Ambulatory Assessment (SAA).

Ulf Ekelund

Ulf Ekelund

University of Limerick

Ulf Ekelund obtained his PhD from the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm Sweden in 2002 and is currently professor in physical activity and health at the Department of Sport Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. Before joining the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences he lead a research programme in physical activity epidemiology at the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge where he currently holds a part time senior investigator scientist position.

His main research interests are related to measurement and population levels of physical activity; the role of physical activity and sedentary behaviour for preventing non-communicable diseases especially obesity and metabolic diseases; and to understand the biological basis for physical activity and sedentary behaviour with a special focus on young people. He has published more than 250 peer-review articles.

Malcolm Granat

Malcolm Granat

University of Salford

Malcolm Granat is Professor of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Salford, UK. He is engaged in research looking at the quantification of free-living physical behaviour. The main focus of his research is the development of new outcomes, based on physical activity patterns, to quantify the effectiveness of interventions in a range of populations and clinical groups (e.g. stroke, OA, intermittent claudication, heart failure, the older person etc.).  Malcolm is Vice President of International Scientific Society for the Measurement of Physical Behaviour.
William (Bill) Haskell

William (Bill) Haskell

Stanford University

William (Bill) Haskell is Professor of Medicine (Active Emeritus) in the Center for Prevention Research at Stanford University. His primary research activities have been in applied and clinical research in chronic disease prevention. Of particular interest has been the role of habitual physical activity on metabolic and hemodynamic factors contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. A continuing research interest has been the development of instruments for the measurement of physical activity in free-living populations. He has served on numerous national and international panels responsible for developing guidelines for physical activity and public health, preventive cardiology, and cardiac rehabilitation.
Jorunn L Helbostad

Jorunn L Helbostad

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Jorunn L Helbostad is physiotherapist and professor in Human Movement Science. She is the leader the cross disciplinary research group, Geriatrics, Movement and Stroke (GeMS) at Department of Neuroscience at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Her main research interests are on mobility at old age with a particular focus on physical activity, gait, balance, falls, and on use of mobile health technology for the purpose of assessment and intervention.  She is currently the coordinator of an EU project on prevention of functional decline in young older people by use of mobile health technology and is the principle investigator of an international project on development of a fall risk assessment tool based on monitored behavioural data.

Charles Matthews

Charles Matthews

National Cancer Institute

Dr. Matthews studies the relationship between physical activity behaviors and the development of cancer in humans. Physical activity behaviors reflect the continuum of human movement that influences energy expenditure and energy balance, and these behaviors range from purely sedentary (e.g., sitting) to physically active pursuits (e.g., light, moderate-vigorous intensity activities).  In his etiologic studies, Dr. Matthews’ seeks to understand how the full spectrum of physical activity behaviors influences cancer risk, the dose-response relations between active and sedentary behaviors and cancer, and the biological mechanisms underlying these relationships.  In his methodological research, Dr. Matthews is working to develop better methods for measuring physical activity behaviors in population-based studies that may help identify new cancer associations and better define the optimal types and amount of physical activity that are associated with reduced risk.  This knowledge is critical to the development of evidence-based public health guidelines for physical activity and cancer prevention and control.

Wendy Nilsen

Wendy Nilsen

National Science Foundation

Wendy Nilsen, Ph.D. is a Program Director for the Smart and Connected Health Program in the Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering at the National Science Foundation. Her work focuses on the intersection of technology and health.  This includes a wide range of methods for data collection, advanced analytics and the creation of effective cyber-human systems. Her interests span the areas of sensing, analytics, cyber-physical systems, information systems, big data and robotics.  More specifically, her efforts include: serving as co-chair of the Health Information Technology Research and Development working group of the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Program; the lead for the NSF/NIH Smart and Connected Health announcement; convening workshops to address methodology in mobile technology research; serving on numerous federal technology initiatives; and, leading training institutes. Previously, Wendy was at the National Institutes of Health.

Dr Nicky Ridgers

Dr Nicky Ridgers

Deakin University

Dr Nicky Ridgers is a Senior Research Fellow in the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN) at Deakin University. Dr Ridgers’ research primarily focuses on the measurement of activity patterns in children and adolescents, and examining factors that influence these patterns. She also focuses on promoting physical activity using theory-based interventions, with a particular emphasis on school settings. Her other research interests include the role of commercial wearable monitors in physical activity promotion.

Alex Rowlands

Alex Rowlands

University of Leicester

Alex Rowlands is a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Leicester (UK). He obtained his PhD from the University of Wales (Bangor, UK) in 1998 and subsequently worked at the University of Exeter (UK) and the University of South Australia, joining the Leicester Diabetes Centre in 2015. His research focuses on the objective measurement of physical behaviours (physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep) using accelerometry-based wearable monitors.
Rebecca Spencer

Rebecca Spencer

UMass Amherst

Dr. Rebecca Spencer is an Associate Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at UMass Amherst and director of the graduate program in Neuroscience. She has a PhD in neuroscience from Purdue University and completed post-doctoral training at the University of California, Berkeley. She has been continuously funded by NIH for sleep research for over 10 years. As director of the Sleep, Cognition, and Action lab at UMass, she currently holds over $2 million in NIH funding for studies of sleep across the lifespan.
Richard (Rick) Troiano

Richard (Rick) Troiano

NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences

Dr. Richard (Rick) Troiano is a Program Director in the Risk Factor Assessment Branch of the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program in NCI’s Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS). Dr. Troiano promotes the validation and use of accelerometer-based devices in the assessment of physical activity in research and population surveillance. He is interested in promoting improved understanding of the information obtained from devices and self-reports and the analytic implications of different data sources.

Dr. Troiano worked with the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to implement the use of devices in the survey to obtain objective measures of participants’ physical activity-related movement and sleep, as well as body strength.

Stewart Trost

Stewart Trost

School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Stewart Trost is a Professor of Child Health in the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, and a member of the QUT Institute of Health and Biomedical Research (IHBI) at the QLD Centre for Children’s Health Research (CCHR). Trost joined QUT 2014 as an invited research capacity building Chair and currently leads the Children’s Physical Activity Research Group at CCHR. Trost is an internationally recognized researcher in the field of measurement of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in clinical populations and has extensive experience developing, testing, and deploying machine learning algorithms for activity recognition and prediction of energy expenditure from wearable sensors. Trost has a particular interest in transdisciplinary research related to the development of mHealth applications to remotely deliver and monitor exercise therapy in children with chronic health conditions.
Catrine Tudor-Locke

Catrine Tudor-Locke

UMass Amherst

Catrine Tudor-Locke is Professor and Department Chair in the School of Public Health and health Sciences at the UMass Amherst USA. Catrine is a walking behavior researcher and a world leader in objective physical activity assessment and promotion, specifically focused on pedometer or accelerometer-determined ambulatory activity captured as steps/day across the lifespan. Catrine is a trained program evaluator and adult educator focused on practical applications in objective monitoring measurement and intervention. She has published widely in the field. Catrine has led the field in elevating the acceptance of step counting for researchers, practitioners, and lay audiences and set benchmark values for interpretation, standardized measurement protocols, and developed program templates centered around step counting.

Dana Wolff-Hughes

Dana Wolff-Hughes

National Institutes of Health’s Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

Dana Wolff-Hughes is a Health Scientist Administrator within the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.  In this position, Dr. Wolff-Hughes’ scientific focus is in the evaluation and implementation of mobile and wireless technologies in behavioral and social science research.  She earned a M.S. in Exercise Physiology and a PhD in Physical Activity Epidemiology from the University of Tennessee.  Her prior research examined how the accuracy of physical activity and diet measures influence the dose response relationships with chronic disease with a focus on methods to better interpret and understand data from activity monitors.